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Archive for the ‘Bibliographie / Bibliography’ Category

The environment as a processor of information is propaganda. Propaganda ends where dialogue begins.” — Marshall McLuhan, Quentin Fiore. The Medium is the Massage. (Toronto : Bantam Books, 1967), 142

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The idea of merging culture with the economy isn’t new, but the recent discourse surrounding it is… Increase innovation and creativity, the argument goes and the profits will follow… Culture, as collapsed into the creative industries means ‘not the traditional fine arts, nor the modernist cultural industries like cinema and radio, but instead the newly minted and digitized professions that shape the lightweight, complex, ephemeral, ever-changing aesthetic experiences of the hyper-mediated city.’ Nevertheless, the traditional arts continue to play a significant role, for along with the vast flows of immaterial goods – software, IP, experience, entertainment – come the material façades.” — Kirsty Robertson, “Crude Culture” Fuse Magazine, (31.2): 2008, 14. Quoting Brian Holmes. “One World One Dream” Continental Drift : The Other Side of Neoliberal Globalization. Accessed 19 August 2008. http://brianholmes.wordpress.com/2008/01/08/one-world-one-dream/

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13 mai 2008, Espace mobile, Vox, Montréal
Elizabeth SIMCOE, View near Montreal. ca. 1792. Watercolour. Archives of Ontario, Simcoe Family Fonds, F47. Reference code F47-11-1-0-60. (http://www.archives.gov.on.ca Accessed 10 May 2008 ) Traded for a critical analysis.

Denis Longchamps is doing his PhD in Art History on the sketchbook imagery of Elizabeth Simcoe (1762-1850). He is arguing that the sketches she made all along her journey through Upper and Lower Canada in the 18th century were done in order to further the colonialist project of her husband, Lieutenant Governor John Simcoe. Denis’ research has been an integral part of the development of this phase of Pictorial Propaganda in the Quartier des spectacles. My research has been based on his astonishing indexing of all of her sketches among disparate collections on Canada and Europe, as well as his scholarly view of her work as colonialist propaganda.

Denis has offered to make a critical analysis of Pictorial Propaganda (as it reproduces the original watercolours of Elizabeth Simcoe) within the context of his own PhD research.

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Ce lieu-là surpasse encore tous les autres en beauté : car les isles qui se rencontrent dans l’emboucheure de ces deux fleuves (le St-Laurent et la Rivière des Prairie), sont autant de grandes et de belles prairies, les unes en long, les autres en rond, ou autant de jardins faits à plaisir, tant pour les fruits qui s’y rencontrent, que pour la forme et l’artifice dont la nature les a préparées, avec tous les agremens que les Peintres peuvent representer dans leur païsage.” — Jérôme Lalement, Relations des Jésuites, 3, année 1663, p 28 cité dans Jean-Claude Marsan, Montréal en évolution, (Montréal : Éditions Fides, 1974), 31

…par conséquent ce fera un jour un pays tres-propre pour eitre la situation d’une grande et grosse ville. Jérôme Lalement, Relations des Jésuites, 3, année 1663, in The Jesuit relations and allied documents travels and explorations of the Jesuit missionaries in New France, 1610-1791 : the original French, Latin, and Italian texts, with English translations and notes, vol 48, p 168 (Early Canadiana Online)

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Art production and acts of generosity are fundamentally generative, but nonlinear, expenditures of time and resources. In this way they contradict the accepted functions of production and utility that are associated with meeting societies basic needs, or the process of its expansion. Each could therefore be seen as potential processes of liberation from the inevitable progress of production…Arguably, it is around this kind of expenditure or value system that culture is defined, arising out of the surplus or excess generated by a society. — Kate Fowle and Lars Bang Larsen “Lunch Hour : Art Community, Administrated Space, and Unproductive Activity” in What We Want is Free : Generosity and Exchange in Recent Art. Ed. Ted Purves (Albany, NY : State University of New York Press, 2005), 17

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Under capitalism, all is spectacle. Branding is the antithesis of neighbourhood. How can the symbolic language inherent to branding adjust to a process that includes the local community: the residents who study and work in a neighbourhood, plus the daily flux of permanent and temporary occupants.” — dAb Collective, “Urbanism versus Branding for Montréal’s Quartier des spectacles” Fuse Magazine 29, no 3 (2006), 24.

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Why did discussions around landscape in Canada before the 1960s tend to champion national difference and distinctiveness, often under the banner of exceptionalism, while more recent debates have focused on issues of colonial power and dispossession, transnational crossovers, and regional idiosyncrasy? What relevance do traditional landscape tropes have in a world of vastly altered political, technological, demographic, and environmental circumstances? And if traditional tropes continue to persist, what does it say about the relationship between contemporary realities and the the authority, power, and influence of conventional understandings of nationhood?” — Beyond Wilderness : The Group of Seven, Canadian Identity, and Contemporary Art. John O’Brian and Peter White Eds. (Montreal : McGill-Queens University Press, 2007), 6.

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